Joseph Roux Thoughts

Found 644 results: Joseph Roux Thoughts

The greatest sweetener of human life is friendship. To raise this to the highest pitch of enjoyment, is a secret which but few discover.

Joseph Addison

When unhappy, one doubts everything; when happy, one doubts nothing.

Joseph Roux

Nothing vivifies, and nothing kills, like the emotions.

Joseph Roux

It is a very rare thing for a man of talent to succeed by his talent.

Joseph Roux

Science is for those who learn; poetry, for those who know.

Joseph Roux

Reason guides but a small part of man, and the rest obeys feeling, true or false, and passion, good or bad.

Joseph Roux

Poetry is the exquisite expression of exquisite expressions.

Joseph Roux

There is a slowness in affairs which ripens them, and a slowness which rots them.

Joseph Roux

Solitude vivifies; isolation kills.

Joseph Roux

We call that person who has lost his father, an orphan; and a widower that man who has lost his wife. But that man who has known the immense unhappiness of losing a friend, by what name do we call him? Here every language is silent and holds its peace in impotence.

Joseph Roux

Experience comprises illusions lost, rather than wisdom gained.

Joseph Roux

Say nothing good of yourself, you will be distrusted; say nothing bad of yourself, you will be taken at your word.

Joseph Roux

Poetry is truth in its Sunday clothes.

Joseph Roux

A fine quotation is a diamond in the hand of a man of wit and a pebble in the hand of a fool.

Joseph Roux

Love is a friendship set to music.

Joseph Campbell

Don't buy a single vote more than necessary. I'll be damned if I'm going to pay for a landslide.

Joseph P. Kennedy

The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress.

Joseph Joubert

If you go in for argument, take care of your temper. Your logic, if you have any, will take care of itself.

Joseph Farrell

May 24, 1980

I have braved, for want of wild beasts, steel cages,
carved my term and nickname on bunks and rafters,
lived by the sea, flashed aces in an oasis,
dined with the-devil-knows-whom, in tails, on truffles.
From the height of a glacier I beheld half a world, the earthly width. Twice have drowned, thrice let knives rake my nitty-gritty.
Quit the country the bore and nursed me.
Those who forgot me would make a city.
I have waded the steppes that saw yelling Huns in saddles, worn the clothes nowadays back in fashion in every quarter, planted rye, tarred the roofs of pigsties and stables, guzzled everything save dry water. I've admitted the sentries' third eye into my wet and foul dreams. Munched the bread of exile; it's stale and warty.
Granted my lungs all sounds except the howl;
switched to a whisper. Now I am forty.
What should I say about my life? That it's long and abhors transparence.
Broken eggs make me grieve; the omelette, though, makes me vomit.
Yet until brown clay has been rammed down my larynx,
only gratitude will be gushing from it.

Joseph Brodsky

There is a much more exact correspondence between the natural and moral world than we are apt to take notice of.

Joseph Butler
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   Next